Credit card – Slim De Walk http://slimdewalk.net/ Mon, 23 May 2022 21:55:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://slimdewalk.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x120.png Credit card – Slim De Walk http://slimdewalk.net/ 32 32 2 men charged with using credit card skimmer at Sam’s Club in Frazer, possibly other locations https://slimdewalk.net/2-men-charged-with-using-credit-card-skimmer-at-sams-club-in-frazer-possibly-other-locations/ Mon, 23 May 2022 21:55:59 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/2-men-charged-with-using-credit-card-skimmer-at-sams-club-in-frazer-possibly-other-locations/ Two men from Romania have been charged by Frazer police with stealing credit card information by installing a skimming device in a self-service checkout lane at the Sam’s Club store in Pittsburgh Mills. They may be responsible for doing the same at Sam’s Club stores in Monroeville, West Mifflin and Butler Township, where card skimmers […]]]>

Two men from Romania have been charged by Frazer police with stealing credit card information by installing a skimming device in a self-service checkout lane at the Sam’s Club store in Pittsburgh Mills.

They may be responsible for doing the same at Sam’s Club stores in Monroeville, West Mifflin and Butler Township, where card skimmers were also found, Frazer Police Chief Terry Kuhns said.

Colceag Constantin, 41, and Raul-Mihani Cojucaru, 40, have been charged with access device fraud and criminal association. They are being held in the Allegheny County Jail in lieu of cash bond of $25,000 each and will face a preliminary hearing on June 6 before District Judge David Sosovicka.

Police say the skimmer was discovered Thursday when an employee attempted to pay for an item and the “1” button on the keypad did not work, according to a criminal complaint.

Store security video from May 16 shows Cojucaru using a cart full of paper towels and toilet paper to block the view of employees while Constantin mounted the device above the regular card reader, according to the complaint.

The skimmers are designed to look like a regular store credit card reader. They sit on top of the existing card reader to capture and store information so it can be retrieved later by thieves, Kuhns said.

Before being arrested, the men twice returned to the store to retrieve information via a Bluetooth connection, he said.

“Our hope is that they weren’t able to take the information gathered about the skimmers and put it on the internet before we arrested them,” Kuhns said. “My advice to anyone who used a self-service payment lane at Sam’s Club between May 15 and the time these suspects were arrested is to closely monitor their credit card statements for any indication of fraud. “

The chief said people should continue to check their statements carefully as there is often a gap between when card information is stolen and when it is sold.

Kuhns said investigators were able to obtain the license plate number of the SUV the two men were driving from security video. They traced the vehicle to a rental company in Kearny, NJ

After a description of the vehicle was issued to area police departments, Constantin and Cojucaru were arrested along Route 8 on Friday by officers from the Northern Regional Police Department.

A black and yellow jacket that one of the men was wearing in the store’s security video was found in the car with items purchased on the date they are accused of placing the skimmer in the store, according to the complaint.

Police executed a search warrant Saturday at the Ross Township motel where the men were staying and confiscated multiple laptops, external storage devices and fake IDs, Kuhns said.

Police said Constantin and Cojucaru had driving licenses, issued in the UK, when they were arrested. Their identity as Romanian nationals was confirmed by the passports found in their motel room.

Asked by investigators about the devices, Constantin told them, “I know what I did. I can’t deny it,” according to the complaint.

Kuhns said the two men flew from Vancouver, B.C. to Seattle, then flew to New York before traveling to New Jersey to rent the vehicle and drive west to New York. Pennsylvania.

“We’re still researching where they were, but it’s pretty safe to assume they placed skimmers in other stores along the way,” he said.

Kuhns said Monroeville, West Mifflin and Butler Township police are investigating whether card skimmers discovered at other Sam’s Club stores in the past few days were planted there by Constantine and Cojucaru.

He said some Walmart stores use the same model of credit card readers found in Sam’s Club stores.

“The skimmers should look like the ones they’re placed on or they’ll be easily noticed,” Kuhns said. “And they always put them in the queues at the self-checkout machines to reduce the chances of them being discovered.”

Monroeville Police Chief Doug Cole confirmed his department recovered a card-skimming device from a Sam’s Club gas pump along the William Penn Highway.

“At this time, we have no charges pending. It’s still under investigation,” Cole said. “We are aware of the skimmers they caught in Frazer Township. We believe they are (connected).

A Butler Township officer said his department was investigating an incident at a Sam’s Club in Moraine Pointe Plaza but would not provide further details.

West Mifflin Police did not respond to a message seeking comment.

Tony LaRussa is a staff writer for Tribune-Review. You can contact Tony at 724-772-6368, tlarussa@triblive.com or via Twitter .

Categories:
Allegheny | Farm | local | Monroeville Times Express | Southern Hills Record | Best Stories | Sending news from the valley

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Debit, credit card reader problems at Meijer https://slimdewalk.net/debit-credit-card-reader-problems-at-meijer/ Sun, 22 May 2022 00:41:35 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/debit-credit-card-reader-problems-at-meijer/ GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) – If you shopped at Meijer today, you may have had issues if you tried to pay with a debit, credit, or electronic benefits transfer card, also known as a relay board. A representative from Meijer’s head office said all Meijer stores nationwide had card payment issues on Saturday. The company […]]]>

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) – If you shopped at Meijer today, you may have had issues if you tried to pay with a debit, credit, or electronic benefits transfer card, also known as a relay board.

A representative from Meijer’s head office said all Meijer stores nationwide had card payment issues on Saturday.

The company representative said shortly before 8 p.m. Saturday that the company’s IT department was working on the issue and hoped to resolve it soon. Meijer did not indicate when the issue might be resolved.

The Meijer website said: “We are currently experiencing issues with payment processing – thank you for your patience as we work to resolve this issue quickly.”

A number of News 8 viewers say they have had difficulty paying with their credit or debit card at several businesses in the area. Additionally, some reported seeing multiple charges appear on their bank accounts even though their card transactions were declined.

There have been social media posts mentioning similar issues at other local businesses, but we were unable to confirm that this is a widespread issue.

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]]> Former MLB pitcher Woodmere mayor pleads guilty to using credit card info stolen from dark web to buy $10,000 worth of gas while delivering Amazon packages https://slimdewalk.net/former-mlb-pitcher-woodmere-mayor-pleads-guilty-to-using-credit-card-info-stolen-from-dark-web-to-buy-10000-worth-of-gas-while-delivering-amazon-packages/ Fri, 20 May 2022 20:09:00 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/former-mlb-pitcher-woodmere-mayor-pleads-guilty-to-using-credit-card-info-stolen-from-dark-web-to-buy-10000-worth-of-gas-while-delivering-amazon-packages/ CLEVELAND, Ohio — Former Woodmere Mayor Charles E. Smith pleaded guilty Thursday to federal charges that accuse him of buying hundreds of stolen credit card numbers from the dark web and using them to buy more than $10,000 worth of gasoline. Smith, who was a pitcher for the Florida Marlins before serving two terms as […]]]>

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Former Woodmere Mayor Charles E. Smith pleaded guilty Thursday to federal charges that accuse him of buying hundreds of stolen credit card numbers from the dark web and using them to buy more than $10,000 worth of gasoline.

Smith, who was a pitcher for the Florida Marlins before serving two terms as mayor of the small southeast suburb of 800 people from 2009 to 2017, used the gas to deliver Amazon packages, prosecutors said.

The 52-year-old faces a mandatory minimum sentence of two years in prison after pleading guilty to one count of aggravated identity theft and access device fraud.

U.S. District Judge Christopher Boyko is expected to sentence Smith on August 25.

Federal prosecutors indicted Smith on April 21 via an information, a sign that a defendant is ready to plead guilty instead of going through the grand jury for indictment.

Smith went to the dark web, a part of the internet that requires special servers to access it and allows users to remain completely anonymous, and purchased account numbers and addresses from hundreds of stolen credit or debit cards. from May 2019 to May 2020, according to prosecutors.

Prosecutors say Smith used a machine to encode account information on blank credit cards.

Smith charged cards more than $10,000 with the information stolen from gas stations in northeast Ohio while delivering packages for Amazon, prosecutors said. Victims of the robbery were spread across 25 states.

Prosecutors said an investigation found Smith purchased account information for more than 600 stolen credit and debit cards.

Smith, who filed for personal bankruptcy in 2009, returned to politics in 2019 and won a seat on Woodmere Village Council. Smith resigned in March 2020 after less than three months in office, citing health reasons, according to Sorrow Valley Today.

Smith, who the Houston Astros signed as an undrafted free agent in 1991, struggled in the minor leagues for nine seasons before making his Major League debut in 2000. Smith pitched in two seasons, ranging from 11-11 with a 3.84 ERA in 34 games.

He struck out 189 in 210 innings and gave up 16 homers, including one of San Francisco Giants hitter Barry Bonds’ record 73 home runs in the 2001 season.

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You Can Now Use a Credit Card for Michigan Attorney General’s FOIA Requests https://slimdewalk.net/you-can-now-use-a-credit-card-for-michigan-attorney-generals-foia-requests/ Wed, 18 May 2022 18:50:00 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/you-can-now-use-a-credit-card-for-michigan-attorney-generals-foia-requests/ No more writing a check, stamping an envelope, and mailing it to an address in Lansing for those paying for the Michigan Attorney General’s Public Records. Attorney General Dana Nessel’s office announced Wednesday that requests under the Freedom of Information Act can now be paid online with a credit or debit card. The idea came […]]]>

No more writing a check, stamping an envelope, and mailing it to an address in Lansing for those paying for the Michigan Attorney General’s Public Records.

Attorney General Dana Nessel’s office announced Wednesday that requests under the Freedom of Information Act can now be paid online with a credit or debit card. The idea came from the late Kelly Rossman-McKinney, who was Nessel’s communications director, after learning last year that a reporter had to deposit a check in person during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A forward-thinking public relations professional, Rossman-McKinney, 67, spent decades in Lansing politics. She began her career in 1979 working in the state capital before starting her own company, which merged with John Truscott in 2011 to form Truscott-Rossman.

In 2018, Rossman-McKinney unsuccessfully ran for a state Senate seat. Subsequently, she became Director of Communications for Attorney General Nessel. She passed away last November after a long battle with cancer.

“His advocacy for journalists and government transparency can now endure even after his death – a true testament to the impact Kelly had on all of us,” Nessel said in the announcement.

FOIA requests are often made by journalists, academics, researchers, and members of the public to access records maintained by public agencies.

A University of Arizona 2019 study using FOIA tracking website data MuckRock found that the average public record fee charged to journalists from 2014 to 2017 was $283 in Michigan, the 3rd highest of the 50 states.

In 2015 Michigan has received an “F” rating from the Center for Public Integrity on public access to information.

Michigan has also been slow to improve its public records laws in recent years, despite Governor Gretchen Whitmer signing a directive in 2019 to improve FOIA transparency that includes cutting high fees. Whitmer’s office, the lieutenant governor, and the legislature remain exempt from FOIA.

Related: Michigan Legislature leaves Sunshine Week in the dark without reforming transparency laws

Several bills related to ethics and transparency have yet to go through committee hearings, MLive reported in March. In addition, bills to create an Open Records Legislative Act and include the governor’s office in the FOIA have been poised for passage by the state Senate since last year.

Michigan AG’s online payment option is now available on the department’s website FOIA page. Applicants will receive an invoice explaining their payment options, which still include the traditional paper check. Cards accepted are MasterCard, Visa, American Express and Discover.

Learn more about MLive:

PR powerhouse Kelly Rossman-McKinney is remembered as a pioneer in Michigan politics

$3 Billion in Michigan Auto Insurance Refunds Distributed – What to Do If Yours Hasn’t Arrived

Michigan unemployment agency failed to protect confidential information, audit finds

Open Meetings Must Be Recorded Under Michigan’s Updated Open Meetings Law

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What to do if your travel or credit card rewards are stolen – Forbes Advisor https://slimdewalk.net/what-to-do-if-your-travel-or-credit-card-rewards-are-stolen-forbes-advisor/ Mon, 16 May 2022 16:20:43 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/what-to-do-if-your-travel-or-credit-card-rewards-are-stolen-forbes-advisor/ Editorial Note: We earn a commission on partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect the opinions or ratings of our editors. Data breaches are becoming all too common, but they primarily affect credit cards. While most people take steps to secure their credit card accounts and protect themselves against identity thieves, few take […]]]>

Editorial Note: We earn a commission on partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect the opinions or ratings of our editors.

Data breaches are becoming all too common, but they primarily affect credit cards. While most people take steps to secure their credit card accounts and protect themselves against identity thieves, few take the same steps against credit card point theft.

What happens when your points and miles are stolen? Although the effects are not as devastating as identity theft, the steps you need to take to protect yourself and restore your points balances are similar. Here’s everything you need to know about what to do if your rewards account is hacked.

How are credit card points stolen

Stealing credit card points is more complicated than stealing a credit card for unauthorized use. Fraudsters need to acquire your ID, successfully hack your account and clean it up. Stolen rewards usually end up being sold on the dark web, redeemed for gift cards, or used for merchandise purchases through the rewards program. Unfortunately, credit card companies don’t have point fraud alerts, so fraudsters can easily go unnoticed.

This practice isn’t new, but the COVID-19 pandemic has presented a great opportunity for scammers. As travelers stopped traveling, they still spent with credit cards and perhaps paid less attention to their rewards accounts. The result was heaps of rewards for the catch.

Forbes contributor Brett Holzhauer fell victim to one of these scammers when his Amex Membership Rewards account was hacked. He and his wife had 200,000 points stolen, but it didn’t stop there: the thieves went shopping with his The Blue Business® Plus credit card from American Express.

In the end, American Express returned his points and removed the fraudulent charges, but what’s concerning is that it only came to Brett’s attention when he received a fraud alert about major purchases the thieves had made. If they hadn’t raised a fraud alert, it might have taken months before he learned of the missing dots.

How to recover your stolen points

Fortunately, there is hope if your points are stolen. If there’s been a data breach and your points are gone, you can get them back by immediately calling your bank or loyalty program. As someone this has happened to in the past, I can attest that it is a relatively painless process. In most cases, the customer service agent will review how the points were redeemed. For example, if the rewards were used for a flight departing from an airport far from your home, with a passenger name that does not match yours, this is an easy way to determine that the booking was not allowed.

Some programs can also see from which location your account was accessed. If it was far from your usual location, that might indicate it wasn’t you. In most cases, determining a fraudulent point redemption is not too difficult. Still, it is crucial to report it immediately when you become aware of it.

In addition to calling your bank or loyalty program to report your points stolen, there are other steps you should take to protect your account. Here’s a step-by-step guide to recovering your points and securing your account after a breach, although many of these steps can be implemented now to prevent unauthorized use of your rewards.

Secure your account

The first thing you’ll want to do when you discover an anomaly in your points balance is secure your account. In addition to points, your loyalty account contains other information that could be compromised. Changing your password and setting up multi-factor authentication helps prevent further data breaches.

If you haven’t already, cybersecurity expert Bahman Hayat recommends setting up a password manager like 1Password. These password managers work by automatically storing and organizing all your usernames, passwords, PINs and account numbers in an encrypted and secure database.

If you haven’t changed your passwords in the past few years, chances are they were compromised in one of dozens of data breaches. You can find out if this is the case by going to Have I been pwned.

Hayat also recommends changing all your account passwords after a data breach. While you’re checking your point balances (more on this step below), it’s also a good time to update your passwords.

Call the program immediately

Once your account is secure, you’ll want to call your relevant loyalty program immediately. In most cases, you should be able to recover your points after an investigation.

Years ago, hackers broke into my Radisson Rewards account and redeemed over 500,000 points for gift cards. As an avid travel hacker, I didn’t know what offended me more – that my points had disappeared or that they had been redeemed at such a low value. Anyway, I called Radisson Rewards and they restored my balance within hours.

However, not all programs will be this fast. When hackers broke into my JetBlue account three years ago, it took me several days to get my points back.

Check if other accounts have been compromised

Once you’ve notified your loyalty program, you’ll want to check your other accounts for similar violations. I use PricePortfolio to track all my points balances in one place.

If you don’t use point tracking, you’ll need to log in to each individual loyalty program account to ensure your balance is intact. Check your balance and recent activity carefully, as your balance may not be completely cleared. This part can be tedious, but it will ensure that you not only secure the account that has been compromised, but the others as well.

How to avoid having your points stolen

When it comes to preventing point theft, a strong offense is the best defense. You should expect your rewards accounts to be hacked at some point. The best way to deal with it is to stay one step ahead of hackers. Here are three steps you can take to prevent point theft.

Track your points

Tracking your points is key to detecting data breaches and ensuring your points aren’t stolen. With point trackers like AwardWallet, you can even set alerts to receive an email when your balance suddenly changes. Ten years ago, that’s how I learned that my Radisson Rewards points had been wiped out by hackers.

Secure your passwords

Password security is essential to prevent account takeovers and point theft. Hayat recommends creating a different password for each account and using a password manager app to store them securely in one place.

Multi-factor authentication should also be part of your password security strategy. Hayat says, “I recommend Microsoft or Google Authenticator. This is preferable to text-based authentication, which is vulnerable to swap attacks.

Be careful what you click

According to Cisco’s Cybersecurity Threat Trends Report, phishing is responsible for 90% of data breaches. Scammers are becoming more sophisticated in creating emails that appear to come from banks and loyalty programs. Some of them will even address you by your first name and ask you to click on a link to read a message or confirm your account information.

When you receive an email like this, it’s best not to click on it at all. Instead, go directly to the bank’s or loyalty program’s website. Sign in securely, then go to the message center or account overview page to see if there’s really anything you need to verify.

At the end of the line

Data breaches are inevitable and will affect almost everyone at some point. The best you can do is secure your accounts to prevent point theft in the first place. Following the steps outlined above can help you recover your points quickly and prevent further violations.

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Credit card rates are still set at 2% per month https://slimdewalk.net/credit-card-rates-are-still-set-at-2-per-month/ Sun, 15 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/credit-card-rates-are-still-set-at-2-per-month/ MANILA, Philippines — The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) is expected to keep the cap on credit card transactions at 2% per month or 24% per annum in a low interest rate environment as the country continues to recover from the impact of the pandemic. Subject to confirmation by the Monetary Board, the cap on […]]]>

MANILA, Philippines — The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) is expected to keep the cap on credit card transactions at 2% per month or 24% per annum in a low interest rate environment as the country continues to recover from the impact of the pandemic.

Subject to confirmation by the Monetary Board, the cap on interest rates or finance charges on outstanding credit card balances approved more than a year ago would likely continue.

“There is no policy change,” BSP Governor Benjamin Diokno said in a text message.

The STAR first reported that the BSP imposes an interest rate or finance charge cap of 2% per month and 24% per annum on the outstanding credit card balance.

Similarly, additional monthly rates that credit card issuers may charge on installment loans have been retained at a maximum rate of 1%, together with a maximum processing fee of P200 per transaction on the use of advances funds on credit card.

BSP formalized the imposition of the Currency Board-approved cap through Circular 1098 issued in late September 2020, and the cap came into effect on November 3, 2020, to help Filipinos deal with the impact of the pandemic.

The maximum rates and charges are subject to review by BSP every six months.

Prior to the imposition of the cap, the annualized interest rate on credit card receivables averaged 36%.

Philippine banks and credit card issuers have reported lower revenues since caps were imposed on credit card fees.

The BSP has maintained an accommodative monetary policy by keeping interest rates at historically low levels since November 2020 to help the economic recovery gain momentum.

As part of its heavy-handed COVID response measures, the central bank cut interest rates by 200 basis points in 2020, taking the benchmark rate to an all-time low of 2%.

The latest data from the central bank showed that consumer loans granted by universal and commercial banks increased by 3.6% to reach 867.79 billion pesos at the end of March.

Credit card loans recorded a strong increase of 12.1% to 446.06 billion pesos, offsetting the 4.2% decline in car loans to 333.16 billion pesos and the 5.5% decline general purpose consumer loans based on wages at 73.98 billion pesos.

At the end of March, credit growth accelerated by 8.9%, from 8.98 trillion pesos to 9.78 trillion pesos, as part of the continued reopening of the economy to following strict COVID quarantine and lockdown measures.

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How to buy Bitcoin (BTC) with a credit card – Forbes Advisor UK https://slimdewalk.net/how-to-buy-bitcoin-btc-with-a-credit-card-forbes-advisor-uk/ Fri, 13 May 2022 23:43:33 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/how-to-buy-bitcoin-btc-with-a-credit-card-forbes-advisor-uk/ Bitcoin’s value has fluctuated considerably in recent years, and its performance in May 2022 saw its value drop below $30,000, half of the $60,000+ it reached in October 2021. So, if you are considering investing in Bitcoin, be aware that there is no guarantee that you will see a return or break even. Such volatility […]]]>

Bitcoin’s value has fluctuated considerably in recent years, and its performance in May 2022 saw its value drop below $30,000, half of the $60,000+ it reached in October 2021.

So, if you are considering investing in Bitcoin, be aware that there is no guarantee that you will see a return or break even.

Such volatility has led the UK’s financial watchdog, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), to repeatedly warn that cryptocurrency buyers should be prepared to lose all of their investments.

If you’re aware of the risks and still want to buy Bitcoin, here’s how to do it using a credit card.

Sign up with a crypto exchange

To buy Bitcoin, you will need to exchange a currency for it.

However you want to pay for your Bitcoin, you will need to use a crypto exchange. Popular exchanges include Coinbase and Binance.

Choose an exchange with a Bitcoin wallet built into their platform and you won’t have to sign up anywhere else. If you want to keep your cryptocurrency in a wallet outside of your chosen exchange, make sure it allows withdrawals and check what fees, if any, apply.

If you intend to buy Bitcoins with your credit card, check if the exchange accepts the brand you have (eg American Express, Visa, Mastercard).

Pay with a credit card

Once you have opened an account with an exchange, you will need to add funds to it.

Some exchanges charge fees for certain payment methods. For example, Coinbase charges no fees when you add funds to your account via wire transfer, but charges 3.99% when you use a credit card.

Also be aware that when you use a credit card to buy bitcoins, your card issuer will treat it as a cash advance. So not only will you likely pay a fee for the exchange, but you’ll also pay a higher interest rate than you would for a regular credit card purchase.

Plus, you’ll likely be charged interest from the time you make the purchase, whether or not you clear your balance afterwards.

Although rare, there are credit cards that charge 0% on cash advances. However, going into debt to buy Bitcoin is not advisable. If you buy Bitcoin with a credit card, you should try to pay off your balance as soon as possible to minimize the interest it will attract.

Order

In the platform you are using, go to Bitcoin and enter the amount you want to invest. Unless you are investing north of £30,000, you will be buying a share of one Bitcoin. If the value of Bitcoin was £30,000 and you invested £1,000, for example, you would own 3.33% of a Bitcoin.

Store your Bitcoins securely

You can store your Bitcoin in your exchange’s built-in wallet or, if you prefer and if the exchange allows it, a wallet provided by a third party. But, if you feel comfortable keeping your Bitcoin in a “hot” wallet, i.e. online, you can instead use a “cold” wallet, which is a storage device not connected to the Internet.

Keep in mind that there may be a fee to withdraw your Bitcoin from the exchange, and if you opt for a cold wallet, you will have to keep your access codes safe or risk being locked out. of your own assets.

How to sell your bitcoin

You can also sell your Bitcoin through a crypto exchange, either immediately or when it hits a certain price. Once sold, you can transfer the money to your bank account – although in some cases you may have to wait a few days before you can withdraw it.

If the profits you make from selling Bitcoin are large enough, you will be liable for capital gains tax (CGT). Everyone has an annual CGT allowance of £12,300. If you have earnings in excess of this amount in a given year, you are likely to be subject to tax.

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Using Credit Card Surcharges to Maximize Revenue https://slimdewalk.net/using-credit-card-surcharges-to-maximize-revenue/ Thu, 12 May 2022 08:03:06 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/using-credit-card-surcharges-to-maximize-revenue/ Legal impediments to surcharges on credit card transactions have diminished for much of the past decade as courts continue to rule that surcharges are permitted. That’s good news for merchants looking to boost their revenue by a few percentage points and cover their card processing fees, but other hurdles remain, including consumer aversion to paying […]]]>

Payroc - Credit Card Surcharge: What Merchants Can Do to Maximize Their Revenue - May 2022 - Find out how merchants maximize the benefits of credit card surcharges

Legal impediments to surcharges on credit card transactions have diminished for much of the past decade as courts continue to rule that surcharges are permitted. That’s good news for merchants looking to boost their revenue by a few percentage points and cover their card processing fees, but other hurdles remain, including consumer aversion to paying surcharges. Payroc - Credit Card Surcharge: What Merchants Can Do to Maximize Their Revenue - May 2022 - Find out how merchants maximize the benefits of credit card surchargesRecent data from PYMNTS has, however, revealed that there is an opening for merchants: most consumers, when faced with a surcharge at the point of sale, will tend to pay for it with relatively minor detriment to their satisfaction vis-à-vis -to the merchant.

Merchants who best manage customer awareness and opinions of supplements will be well positioned to maximize revenue from these fees. Despite the opposition most cardholders express to surcharges, 85% of credit card users pay these fees when faced with them. Cardholders in this situation find another form of payment only 14% of the time and leave the store only in rare cases. Our data indicates that merchants will need the right approach to reap the benefits of surcharges without forcing customers to transfer their business to other merchants.

These are just some of the main conclusions of Credit Card Surcharges: What Merchants Can Do to Maximize Revenuea PYMNTS and payroc collaboration that describes how merchants can maximize their benefits and limit customer fallout from card surcharges. We surveyed 2,507 credit card users in the United States from December 8 to December 22, 2021 about the impact of surcharges on their card usage and whether the charges caused them to use another payment method – or pushed to take their business to another store. or a restaurant to avoid the extra cost.Payroc - Credit Card Surcharge: What Merchants Can Do to Maximize Their Revenue - May 2022 - Find out how merchants maximize the benefits of credit card surcharges

Some additional key findings include:

• About 9% of cardholders who used their card at restaurants or retail stores in the past month had to pay additional fees on credit card transactions. Cardholders tend to be willing to pay surcharges, although the type of institution has an impact on the acceptance rate. When a customer is determined to avoid the surcharge, merchants who offer a sufficient number of payment alternatives increase the likelihood that they will retain customer activity.

• Thirty-seven percent of all credit card holders have knowingly paid surcharges on card purchases. Another 20% paid extras but didn’t realize it until they looked at their receipts or account statements. Cardholders who know what’s going on are usually willing to accept surcharges.

Payroc - Credit Card Surcharge: What Merchants Can Do to Maximize Their Revenue - May 2022 - Find out how merchants maximize the benefits of credit card surcharges• Seventy-one percent of cardholders who have not had to pay a surcharge for a purchase, or are unsure if they have paid for one, say that surcharges would reduce their satisfaction with of a merchant. But most of these cardholders, facing surcharges, tend to accept the additional charges.

Merchants need to make up for consumers’ stated aversion to credit card surcharges if they want to get the most out of them. PYMNTS data revealed that 58% of cardholders say they will avoid card surcharges if faced with the prospect of paying them, but the reality is that surcharges are imposed on less than 10% of purchases by card and that consumers pay for them in 85% of these cases. . Merchants who strive to maintain good relationships with their customers can derive additional revenue from surcharges without disrupting their business.

To learn more about how merchants maximize their benefits with credit card surcharges, To download The report.

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Ontario woman warns against choosing credit card PIN after RBC refuses to refund $8,772 https://slimdewalk.net/ontario-woman-warns-against-choosing-credit-card-pin-after-rbc-refuses-to-refund-8772/ Tue, 10 May 2022 01:12:32 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/ontario-woman-warns-against-choosing-credit-card-pin-after-rbc-refuses-to-refund-8772/ An Ontario woman is warning people about what they choose as their credit card PIN after saying RBC refused to refund nearly $9,000 in fraudulent charges. Ajax wife Rosina Ego-Aguirre said she traveled to downtown Toronto with a friend to visit Ripley’s Aquarium in early April. Before arriving at the aquarium, Ego-Aguirre said, she stopped […]]]>

An Ontario woman is warning people about what they choose as their credit card PIN after saying RBC refused to refund nearly $9,000 in fraudulent charges.

Ajax wife Rosina Ego-Aguirre said she traveled to downtown Toronto with a friend to visit Ripley’s Aquarium in early April. Before arriving at the aquarium, Ego-Aguirre said, she stopped for coffee and at some point her wallet was taken out of her purse.

She said she had five cards in her wallet, three of which were from RBCa die BMO and one of Mandarin.

The 70-year-old said that within two hours of her wallet being stolen, more than $20,000 in fraudulent purchases were made on her various cards, including $9,242 through her RBC cards.

“I received a voicemail from RBC letting me know there was unusual activity on my credit card,” Ego-Aguirre told CTV News Toronto.

Ego-Aguirre said she called RBC immediately to discuss the transactions, but waited over 40 minutes for no response. Still downtown, she decided to go to the nearest branch to have her cards blocked.

She said she waited over two hours for the branch to get hold of RBC’s fraud department. Ego-Aguirre said she finally received a temporary client card to use and was told RBC would follow up with her in the coming days.

“When I was dealing with the fraud department, the lady asked me about my PIN,” she said.

Ego-Aguirre said RBC asked her if she had used a PIN associated with her birthday.

“I said yes.’ I was honest, I wasn’t going to lie,” she said. “Then they told me they couldn’t refund anything because it was my fault.”

According to Ego-Aguirre, RBC will only reimburse him $470 in fees processed per tap. She says $8,772 in transactions the thieves made using a PIN will not be refunded because her numbers weren’t secure enough.

Ego-Aguirre said BMO and Tangerine, where she uses a similar PIN, refunded the full amount within days.

“The manner in which I was treated by RBC during this experience added to the trauma of being a victim of crime and additionally brought up strong feelings of disappointment, rejection, betrayal and pain,” said she declared.

Ego-Aguirre said she has used this PIN for over 20 years and has been an RBC client for over 43 years.

“My husband and I are both retired. We are senior citizens and we live on a pension. What they are trying to hold me back to is basically a one-year pension,” he said. she stated. “In my house, every penny counts.”

In a statement to CTV News Toronto, RBC said “in all (fraud) cases, we work with the customer throughout the process and keep them informed, as we continue to do in this case.”

“Customers should choose a PIN that they can easily remember, but avoid numbers and letters that others might guess, such as your date of birth, phone number or address.”

The bank said it would not comment. more on Ego-Aguirre’s situation due to privacy concerns.

“I feel like I’ve been let down by the institution I’ve trusted for the past 43 years,” Ego-Aguirre said.

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Caramel credit card theft service is gaining popularity https://slimdewalk.net/caramel-credit-card-theft-service-is-gaining-popularity/ Sun, 08 May 2022 15:06:03 +0000 https://slimdewalk.net/caramel-credit-card-theft-service-is-gaining-popularity/ A credit card theft service is growing in popularity, giving any unskilled malicious actor an easy, automated way to get started in the world of financial fraud. Credit card skimmers are malicious scripts that are injected into hacked e-commerce websites that quietly wait for customers to make a purchase on the site. Once the purchase […]]]>

A credit card theft service is growing in popularity, giving any unskilled malicious actor an easy, automated way to get started in the world of financial fraud.

Credit card skimmers are malicious scripts that are injected into hacked e-commerce websites that quietly wait for customers to make a purchase on the site.

Once the purchase is made, these malicious scripts steal the credit card details and send them back to remote servers to be collected by hackers.

Threat actors then use these cards to make their own online purchases or sell credit card details on dark web markets to other threat actors for as little as a few dollars.

The Caramel skimmer as a service

The new service was discovered by Domain toolswhich states that the platform is operated by a Russian cybercrime organization named “CaramelCorp”.

This service provides subscribers with a skimmer script, deployment instructions, and a campaign management panel, which is all a malicious actor needs to launch their own credit card theft campaign.

The Caramel service only sells to Russian-speaking hackers, using an initial verification process that excludes those who use machine translation or who are inexperienced in this area.

A lifetime subscription costs $2,000, which isn’t cheap for budding cybercriminals, but promises Russian-speaking hackers full customer support, code upgrades, and ever-changing anti-detection measures.

Caramel skimmer deployed at a Nigerian site
Caramel skimmer deployed at a Nigerian site (Domain Tools)

Vendors claim without verification that Caramel can bypass protection services from Cloudflare, Akamai, Incapsula and others.

Buyers receive a “quick start” guide to JavaScript methods that work particularly well in specific CMSs (content management systems).

Because credit card skimming scripts are written in JavaScript, Caramel offers subscribers a variety of obfuscation techniques to prevent them from being easily detected.

The Caramel JS Obfuscator Tool
The Caramel JS Obfuscator Tool (Domain Tools)

The collection of credit card data is done through the “setInterval()” method, which exfiltrates data between fixed periods. Although it does not appear to be an effective method, it can help steal details of even abandoned carts and incomplete purchases.

Finally, the administration of the campaigns is done via a panel where the subscriber can supervise the compromised e-shops, manage the gateways for receiving stolen data, etc.

caramel panel
The Caramel Control Panel (KELA)

In operation since 2020

Skimming campaigns aren’t new, and neither is Caramel. Bleeping Computer was able to find the first dark web postings offering the kit for purchase in December 2020.

2020 article promoting Caramel
2020 article promoting Caramel (KELA)

However, continued development and promotion helped Caramel become more popular in the underground community.

The existence of Caramel and other such skimming services removes the technical barrier to setting up and operating large-scale card skimming campaigns, potentially making skimming campaigns even more common.

For customers of e-commerce platforms, you can protect yourself from credit card skimmers by using private single-use cards, setting billing limits and restrictions, or simply using online payment systems instead of cards.

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